#FridayReads: After the Crown by KB Wagers

Picture of After the Crown by KB Wagers

This year, I’ve decided to pick a specific reading theme: women authors of science fiction. That doesn’t mean I’ll only read female SF authors or only SF, but that’s going to be my primary focus.

After the Crown by K. B. Wagers is the second book in the Indranan War trilogy, the first of which is Before the Throne. The third book should be out this winter, but I’m not excited about having to wait almost a year for it to come out!

The Indranan War trilogy so far is a fantastic sci-fi adventure with a strong female lead, diverse characters throughout, and an interesting setting. The Indranan Empire is made up of the descendants of Indian space travelers from centuries ago, and they have more or less kept the Hindu belief system and what amounts to a less strict caste system. The twist is that a disorder called space madness affected men more than women, leading the original patriarchy to become a matriarchy.

The main character is Hail, the last member of the royal family left alive after an attempt to take over the throne. Hail ran away from home after her father’s death and became Cressen Stone, a hardened gunrunner. But two Trackers find her and bring her home to her dying mother.

Reluctantly, Hail steps back into the role of princess, and of course that’s when all hell breaks loose. Things escalate in After the Crown, and I’d highly recommend this series to anyone who loves space opera starring women, including¬†Star Wars and Anne Leckie’s Ancillary trilogy.

Honk honk: August 2016 edition

Today is the first day in a long time where I haven’t had to be anywhere or do anything. It feels nice, if weird. I feel like I can breathe a little, plan the rest of my summer, and actually enjoy the nerdy nerdy things I love (oh video games, how I’ve missed you).

Time, as always, still runs out before I accomplish everything on my list (plus all the things I want to do but don’t put on my list), but I still have a good number of accomplishments to round up from the first stretch of summer:

  • My short story “What Jeannie Needs” was published in Rose Red Review,
    an online journal that publishes modern fairy tales. I’ll write up a little behind the scenes post for this story in the near future.
  • I interviewed Ranbir Singh Sidhu for The Rumpus. If you recall, I wrote about Ranbir’s book Good Indian Girls on this blog and followed that up with a short interview. After reading his novel, I wanted to do something more in depth. I highly recommend Deep Singh Blue, especially for anyone who’s ever felt completely out of place.
  • My short story “The Time I Listened to Warren Zevon for One Year Straight” will appear in Permafrost’s Summer 2016 online issue.
  • For the work blog, I wrote about my corgi’s degenerative nerve disease and the debut novel Lily and the Octopus, and apparently made some people cry. I also wrote about Pok√©mon Go, which hopefully didn’t make anyone cry.
  • And finally, my review of Sherrie Flick’s Whiskey, Etc., written for the work blog, was syndicated on Littsburgh. This is another fantastic book that I highly recommend.

Even though this is a great list, I feel guilty about the things I haven’t done: written a synopsis for my short story collection and novel so I can attempt to sell both projects to an agent, reading a friend’s novel, reading my husband’s novel, devoting serious time to Wild Age Press… I could go on forever. It’s something I’m working on with my therapist.

Maybe one day I’ll hack this time thing. But in the more likely scenario that I don’t, I’ll try to remember that friends, family, and writing are the important things, and those should always come before all the necessary chores of life.

#FridayReads July 1, 2016

fridayreads16.07.01

Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley: A bittersweet novel that avoids all the “man’s best friend” cliches and reminds why we love dogs so much, even though we outlive them.

Create Your Writer Platform by Chuck Sambuchino: An informative, no-nonsense book about the how, what, where, and when of getting seen online and, to a lesser degree, in print.

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson: A quirky comic about a girl who wants to become a sidekick to her favorite villain.

Morning Glories Volume 9 by Nick Spencer, Joe Eisma, and Rodin Esquejo: The continuing adventures of a group of students held prisoner by their teachers and their efforts to figure out exactly what the school is and what their teachers are up to, and to escape.

What’s on your currently reading shelf this week?